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Creating a company while being employed

Newbee     1 0

I´m currently working with a high skill migrant visa, I´m in the process of getting the permanent residence, but I would like to start now my own business. Since I will keep my full time job, I´m not sure which type of company is better for me and once I´m registered do I have to inform my employer? how will that change my income from the full time job?

 

I hope someone went through a similar experience

 

Thanks

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Moderator     8,9k 9 861

Welcome to the HL Forum

 

Starting your own business on the side of an employment should essentially not be a problem, unless it is a business that competes in with your employer...

 

It is always advisable to discuss this plan in advance with your employer.

 

It does not change your income from your employment, but of course you are obliged to pay your taxes.

 

 


Succes & Groet, Hans van den Bergh, A.C.T.I.V.E. (Adviseur, Coach, Trainer, Inbrenger Van Expertise)-Consultant, Hospitality & Leisure Ondernemer 'In Ruste', Gediplomeerd Specialist Arbeidsrecht (arbeidsrechter.nl), MSc-Student Design Driven Innovation (nhlstenden.com); (Let Op: Mijn reacties als vrijwillig Moderator zijn op basis van toetsing aan de Forumregels, als forumlid zijn deze op persoonlijke titel)

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Legend     22,5k 5 1383
56 minuten geleden, Hans van den Bergh zei:

It is always advisable to discuss this plan in advance with your employer.

 

Always? There needs to be a solid ground for an employer to get involved with personal choices of employees. Think again...
 


Hiep hiep hoera: honderd jaar A4  :partying-face:  (DIN = Duits Instituut voor Normalisatie)

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Moderator     8,9k 9 861
12 minuten geleden, TwaBla zei:

 

Always? There needs to be a solid ground for an employer to get involved with personal choices of employees. Think 

 

True, but it is advisable...


Succes & Groet, Hans van den Bergh, A.C.T.I.V.E. (Adviseur, Coach, Trainer, Inbrenger Van Expertise)-Consultant, Hospitality & Leisure Ondernemer 'In Ruste', Gediplomeerd Specialist Arbeidsrecht (arbeidsrechter.nl), MSc-Student Design Driven Innovation (nhlstenden.com); (Let Op: Mijn reacties als vrijwillig Moderator zijn op basis van toetsing aan de Forumregels, als forumlid zijn deze op persoonlijke titel)

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Moderator+     7,4k 25 1342
Op 9-9-2022 om 17:27, Gabriela zei:

Since I will keep my full time job, I´m not sure which type of company is better for me.

 

In the Netherlands having a job does not change the way you need to register.

Main choices are an eenmanszaak or a Besloten Vennootschap (BV in short)

 

With an eenmanszaak you personally liable for all debts  and liabilities from the contracts you close.

With a BV you can (largly) limited your personal liablility.

 

When you start your business on the side then eenmanszaak is the most common choice as you only have to add your profits onto your yearly income-statement  (inkomstenbelasting)

Only when you start a high risk business or liablilities a BV can be wise also. Under a BV you pay corporate tax (vennootschapsbelasting) and you also have to deal with more complex regulations 

 

on this site from the government you can find more information on how to start your business

https://business.gov.nl/starting-your-business/

 

I think for you it is equally  or more important to be a 100% sure you are not in breach with your current permit requirements. IND can be very strickt. But since you are not asking about that I will leave it at this comment.

 

Quote

and once I´m registered do I have to inform my employer?


Yes at some point you will need to. But how and when depents on your specific situation.
For standard employee (for Dutch perminet residents) contracts it was in the Netherlands  common to have a general clause you could only work somewhere else with permission.


For expats like you on special visa. The restrictions are most likely to come from the migrant visa then from the employer. Be sure to tripple check you are not in breach of any conditions on your current visa.

 

Refering to my comment on how it is for Dutch residents, it is or schoul say was pretty common to have limitations in the contract for side-jobs (old skool contracts often say you must have written permission), more modern employment contracts will have an inform clause where you have to inform your employer and they will give you a "No objection" statement if everything is fine. (or will talk to you on specific conditions)
as recent as 1 august 2022 the rules for what restrictions an employer can make where drasticly changed. Before that date there was no legislation. All limitiations that the employee agreed too where legal and enforcible. So also that all other jobs need permission.
Now employers set restriction if there is a "important reason" (dont know the legal term in English)
 

In the Netherlands it is a lot less common to have multiple jobs than in a lot of other countries and that makes contracts in NL a bit more restrictive then you might be used too. So my advice on informing your employer would be to ask at HR for regulations if you have no online handbook that explains. Educate yourself on how your employer looks at this. Remember the rules only changed a month ago so some information might be outdated or subject to change.

If you have a dedicated HR contact as expat I would discuss with them. Both the impact on your current job and aslo the possible visa implications.

 

Quote

how will that change my income from the full time job?

 

If you are taxed like all Dutch (permanent) residents then there is no impact on your net income

 

If you are taxed based on the 30% ruling / facility then starting a business can have impact. But I do not have the knowledge of this facility to inform you about implications. But I do know the facility is restictive and can be withdrawn if circumstances change (too) much.

But this can / will also happen when you become a permanent resident.

Then the implications are:

- you net income from your job will become lower due to higher wage-taxes.

- you must (re)negociate certain reimbursements of costs that are now covered under the tax reduction.

 

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Legend     22,5k 5 1383
(aangepast)
1 uur terug, Roel J zei:

Yes at some point you will need to. But how and when depents on your specific situation.
For standard employee (for Dutch perminet residents) contracts it was in the Netherlands  common to have a general clause you could only work somewhere else without permission.

 

That should probably be with.

 

1 uur terug, Roel J zei:

as recent as 1 august 2022 the rules for what restrictions an employer can make where drasticly changed

 

Wow, that is a few weeks ago! No wonder not all experts seem to know the new regulations. Are there any links to know what restrictions are left? And is/was starting your own company considered to be working somewhere else?

 

I looked it up and we are talking about the so-called nevenwerkzaamhedenbeding.

 

Quote

In het nieuwe artikel 7:653a BW is bepaald dat een beding dat werknemer verbiedt om buiten de reguliere arbeidstijden voor anderen nevenwerkzaamheden te verrichten nietig is, tenzij dit beding kan worden gerechtvaardigd op grond van een objectieve reden.

 

In the old situation you would have had to ask your employer for permission if (and only if) your contract had this specific limitation. So Hans' suggestion that it is always advisable was just a personal opinion, not based in law or contract. There was never any obligation, unless you signed a contract with a nevenwerkzaamhedenbeding.
 

In the new situation since august these contractual stipulations are non-valid (nietig) unless the employer can argue why working elsewhere will affect the job negatively. Of course this will be more specified by the courts over the coming years.

 

It makes a big difference if you have to ask your current employer permission to start a side-business or if you can simple inform them and discuss how both jobs can best be combined.

 

Many modern employers will even support employees who start a side-business! :smiling-face-with-sunglasses:

aangepast door TwaBla

Hiep hiep hoera: honderd jaar A4  :partying-face:  (DIN = Duits Instituut voor Normalisatie)

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Moderator     8,9k 9 861
2 uur geleden, TwaBla zei:

...you would have had to ask your employer for permission...

...So Hans' suggestion that it is always advisable...

 

I did not suggest to 'ask for permission', but to 'discuss'

 

Openly discussing the matter is always advisable (yes, in my opinion) because only then one can take the employer's opinion in consideration as well... nothing wrong with that.

 

And whether an advice should be taken in consideration, is up to Topicstarter Gabriela


Succes & Groet, Hans van den Bergh, A.C.T.I.V.E. (Adviseur, Coach, Trainer, Inbrenger Van Expertise)-Consultant, Hospitality & Leisure Ondernemer 'In Ruste', Gediplomeerd Specialist Arbeidsrecht (arbeidsrechter.nl), MSc-Student Design Driven Innovation (nhlstenden.com); (Let Op: Mijn reacties als vrijwillig Moderator zijn op basis van toetsing aan de Forumregels, als forumlid zijn deze op persoonlijke titel)

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Legend     22,5k 5 1383
(aangepast)

 

1 uur geleden, Hans van den Bergh zei:

Openly discussing the matter is always advisable (yes, in my opinion) because only then one can take the employer's opinion in consideration as well... nothing wrong with that.

 

Not too long ago women would get fired from jobs as soon as they got married. Or women would not get a job if they were pregnant. So what you tell and what you don't, what you have to tell and what you won't, makes a huge difference. Professionals in employment regulations know that.

 

The legal obligations are way more important than personal opinions, because the law slowly follows changes in society.

aangepast door TwaBla

Hiep hiep hoera: honderd jaar A4  :partying-face:  (DIN = Duits Instituut voor Normalisatie)

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Moderator     8,9k 9 861
3 uur geleden, TwaBla zei:

The legal obligations are way more important than personal opinions

 

They are indeed, an employee has a constitutional (artikel 19) freedom in choice of employment.


Succes & Groet, Hans van den Bergh, A.C.T.I.V.E. (Adviseur, Coach, Trainer, Inbrenger Van Expertise)-Consultant, Hospitality & Leisure Ondernemer 'In Ruste', Gediplomeerd Specialist Arbeidsrecht (arbeidsrechter.nl), MSc-Student Design Driven Innovation (nhlstenden.com); (Let Op: Mijn reacties als vrijwillig Moderator zijn op basis van toetsing aan de Forumregels, als forumlid zijn deze op persoonlijke titel)

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